The symptoms and diagnosis of chemical dependency on alcohol

Inhalants What causes drug abuse or dependence?

The symptoms and diagnosis of chemical dependency on alcohol

Has signs of a possible heart attack, such as chest pain or pressure Has any other troublesome physical or psychological reaction to use of the drug Staging an intervention People struggling with addiction usually deny that their drug use is problematic and are reluctant to seek treatment. An intervention presents a loved one with a structured opportunity to make changes before things get even worse and can motivate someone to seek or accept help.

An intervention should be carefully planned and may be done by family and friends in consultation with a doctor or professional such as a licensed alcohol and drug counselor, or directed by an intervention professional. It involves family and friends and sometimes co-workers, clergy or others who care about the person struggling with addiction.

During the intervention, these people gather together to have a direct, heart-to-heart conversation with the person about the consequences of addiction and ask him or her to accept treatment. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Causes Like many mental health disorders, several factors may contribute to development of drug addiction.

What Is Alcohol Use Disorder?

The main factors are: Environmental factors, including your family's beliefs and attitudes and exposure to a peer group that encourages drug use, seem to play a role in initial drug use. Once you've started using a drug, the development into addiction may be influenced by inherited genetic traits, which may delay or speed up the disease progression.

Changes in the brain Physical addiction appears to occur when repeated use of a drug changes the way your brain feels pleasure. The addicting drug causes physical changes to some nerve cells neurons in your brain. Neurons use chemicals called neurotransmitters to communicate.

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These changes can remain long after you stop using the drug. Risk factors People of any age, sex or economic status can become addicted to a drug. Certain factors can affect the likelihood and speed of developing an addiction: Family history of addiction.

Drug addiction is more common in some families and likely involves genetic predisposition.

The symptoms and diagnosis of chemical dependency on alcohol

If you have a blood relative, such as a parent or sibling, with alcohol or drug addiction, you're at greater risk of developing a drug addiction. Using drugs can become a way of coping with painful feelings, such as anxiety, depression and loneliness, and can make these problems even worse.

Peer pressure is a strong factor in starting to use and misuse drugs, particularly for young people. Lack of family involvement. Difficult family situations or lack of a bond with your parents or siblings may increase the risk of addiction, as can a lack of parental supervision.

Using drugs at an early age can cause changes in the developing brain and increase the likelihood of progressing to drug addiction. Taking a highly addictive drug.

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Some drugs, such as stimulants, cocaine or opioid painkillers, may result in faster development of addiction than other drugs. Smoking or injecting drugs can increase the potential for addiction. Taking drugs considered less addicting — so-called "light drugs" — can start you on a pathway of drug use and addiction.

Complications Drug use can have significant and damaging short-term and long-term effects. Taking some drugs can be particularly risky, especially if you take high doses or combine them with other drugs or alcohol.

Here are some examples. Methamphetamine, opiates and cocaine are highly addictive and cause multiple short-term and long-term health consequences, including psychotic behavior, seizures or death due to overdose.

GHB and flunitrazepam may cause sedation, confusion and memory loss. These so-called "date rape drugs" are known to impair the ability to resist unwanted contact and recollection of the event.

At high doses, they can cause seizures, coma and death. The danger increases when these drugs are taken with alcohol. Ecstasy or molly MDMA can cause dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and complications that can include seizures.

Long-term, MDMA can damage the brain. One particular danger of club drugs is that the liquid, pill or powder forms of these drugs available on the street often contain unknown substances that can be harmful, including other illegally manufactured or pharmaceutical drugs.

Due to the toxic nature of inhalants, users may develop brain damage of different levels of severity. Other life-changing complications Dependence on drugs can create a number of dangerous and damaging complications, including:Learn more about anxiety disorders, including types, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

The term "Chemical Dependency" is often used in conjunction with and at times interchangeably with the terms: chemically dependent, chemical dependence, alcoholism, addiction, substance abuse, substance dependence, drug habit, and drug addiction.

Signs and symptoms of alcohol dependence. but in the long term alcohol makes these disorders worse because it interferes with the chemical balance in our brains. In England in , , prescriptions for drugs to treat alcohol dependency .

The main words used medically to describe substance abuse or addiction include the following: Substance (drug) abuse (alcohol or other drugs) Substance abuse is the medical term used to describe a pattern of using a substance (drug) that causes significant problems or distress. The psychological assessment (also called the biopsychosocial or psychiatric assessment) gathers information to diagnose any mental disorder that the person may have; it is the first step in treating a diagnosed disorder.

The term dual diagnosis is often used interchangeably with the terms co-morbidity, co-occurring illnesses, concurrent disorders, comorbid disorders, co-occurring disorder, dual .

Substance use disorder: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia